Monday, June 25, 2007

Larry Silverstein and 9/11: Wake Up From Your Slumber



All the evidence suggests that 9/11 was an Israeli false flag operation, carried out with the assistance of key individuals and elements within the United States by a Zionist elite. One of these individuals is Larry Silverstein, who purchased the 99 year lease on the World Trade Center complex in July 2001 and who oversaw control of the complex before and during the attacks, along with Australian real estate tycoon Frank Lowy of Westfield America. Silverstein and Lowy are good friends, and Silverstein has been a director of Lowy's Westfield America since May 1997. Silverstein is connected to the Zionist elite in Israel in numerous ways, most notably via his close association and friendship with no less than three former Israeli prime ministers, namely Benjamin Netanyahu, Ariel Sharon and Ehud Barak. Silverstein is especially close to Benjamin Netanyahu who was in New York on the morning of 9/11, and who fathered the "war on terror" doctine. According to Haaretz.com, "Many Israeli politicians are acquainted in one degree or another with the 70-year-old Silverstein." It's via these channels that Silverstein was uniquely placed to assist Israeli intelligence and the Zionist mafia in Israel and America with carrying out the 9/11 attacks.

As an American born Jew, Silverstein is committed to Jewish causes. He was chairman of the board of the United Jewish Appeal (UJA) and remains a member of the executive committee, along with his wife, Klara, who is also a founding member of the Jewish Women's Foundation. His son, Roger, and his daughter, Lisa, are also UJA contributors. Roger Silverstein, director of leasing for WTC 7, serves on the executive committee of the Real Estate Executive Division of the UJA, and his daughter Lisa is co-chair of the UJA (source). According to it's website, the UJA is the most successful local charity in the history of the United States, and has raised millions of dollars in support of the Jewish community and the state of Israel.

Putin’s War-whoop: The impending clash with Russia: Mike Whitney

The deployment of the US Missile Defense System in Eastern Europe is a de-facto declaration of war on the Russian Federation . As Russian President Putin said in a recent press conference, “If this missile system is put in place, it will work automatically with the entire nuclear capability of the United States . It will be an integral part of the US nuclear capability.” This will disrupt the current configuration of international security and force Russia to begin work on a new regime of tactical nuclear weapons. This is a very serious development. Russia will now have to rethink its current policy vis a vis the United States and develop a long-range strategy for fending off further hostile encroachments into former-Soviet states by NATO.

Welcome to the new Cold War.

Putin cannot ignore the gravity of the proposed system or the threat it poses to Russia ’s national security. Bush’s Missile Defense is not defensive at all, but offensive. It thrusts US military bases--with nuclear infrastructure and radar--up to Russia ’s doorstep giving the US a clear advantage in “first-strike” capability. That means that Washington will be able to intimidate Russia on issues that are of critical international importance. Putin cannot allow this. He must force Bush to remove this dagger held to Moscow ’s throat.

Friday, June 15, 2007

Daniel Pipes Details Israeli Attack Against Iran: Kurt Nimmo

Earlier this week, warmonger and Israel Firster Joe Lieberman said “I think we’ve got to be prepared to take aggressive military action against the Iranians to stop them from killing Americans in Iraq,” predicating, as neocons are wont, his argument on allegation. Now we have yet another Israel Firster and former United States Institute of Peace—as in war is peace—board member nominee, Daniel Pipes, calling for an attack against Iran.

Putin's Censored Press Conference: Mike Whitney for GlobalResearch.ca

On Tuesday, Russian President Vladimir Putin gave an hour and a half-long press conference which was attended by many members of the world media. The contents of that meeting---in which Putin answered all questions concerning nuclear proliferation, human rights, Kosovo, democracy and the present confrontation with the United States over missile defense in Europe---have been completely censored by the press. Apart from one brief excerpt which appeared in a Washington Post editorial, (and which was used to criticize Putin) the press conference has been scrubbed from the public record. It never happened.

Putin’s performance was a tour de force. He fielded all of the questions however misleading or insulting. He was candid and statesmanlike and demonstrated a good understanding of all the main issues.

Thursday, June 07, 2007

The corporate takeover of U.S. intelligence: Tim Shorrock (Global Research)

More than five years into the global "war on terror," spying has become one of the fastest-growing private industries in the United States. The federal government relies more than ever on outsourcing for some of its most sensitive work, though it has kept details about its use of private contractors a closely guarded secret. Intelligence experts, and even the government itself, have warned of a critical lack of oversight for the booming intelligence business.

On May 14, at an industry conference in Colorado sponsored by the Defense Intelligence Agency, the U.S. government revealed for the first time how much of its classified intelligence budget is spent on private contracts: a whopping 70 percent. Based on this year’s estimated budget of at least $48 billion, that would come to at least $34 billion in contracts. The figure was disclosed by Terri Everett, a senior procurement executive in the Office of the Director of National Intelligence, the agency established by Congress in 2004 to oversee the 16 agencies that make up the U.S. intelligence infrastructure. A copy of Everett's unclassified PowerPoint slide presentation, titled "Procuring the Future" and dated May 25, was obtained by Salon. (It has since become available on the DIA's Web site.) "We can't spy ... If we can't buy!" one of the slides proclaims, underscoring the enormous dependence of U.S. intelligence agencies on private sector contracts.

The DNI figures show that the aggregate number of private contracts awarded by intelligence agencies rose by about 38 percent from the mid-1990s to 2005. But the surge in outsourcing has been far more dramatic measured in dollars: Over the same period of time, the total value of intelligence contracts more than doubled, from about $18 billion in 1995 to about $42 billion in 2005.